The story behind the assassin's teapot

The story of the assassin's teapot begins in the early days of the British Empire.

At that time, assassins were often hired to kill important political figures.

In order to prevent these assassinations, the British government decided to create a special teapot that would be used to poison the tea of potential targets.

The teapot was designed with a hidden compartment that could only be opened by a special key.

This key was given to a trusted member of the government who would then use it to poison the tea of anyone deemed to be a threat.

The plan worked for several years, but eventually the secret of the teapot was leaked and it became famous as the "assassin's teapot."

 

Today, the teapot is on display in the British Museum, where it serves as a reminder of the lengths that governments will go to in order to protect their interests.

Related:Pythagoras Cup

In 1881, U.S. President James A. Garfield was fatally shot by an assassin named Charles Guiteau.

As the story goes, Guiteau was angry that he had not been given a government job after Garfield's election, and so he decided to take matters into his own hands.

 

 

On July 2, he followed Garfield into a Washington, D.C. train station and shot him twice in the back.

Garfield died two weeks later, and Guiteau was arrested and put on trial for murder.

During the trial, prosecutors presented evidence that Guiteau had bought a small teapot shortly before the shooting.

This teapot became known as the "assassin's teapot," and it is currently on display at the Smithsonian Institution.

While the teapot may not have played a direct role in Garfield's death, it is a reminder of the tragic events of that summer day in 1881.

Where did the assassin's teapot come from?

There are many theories about the origins of the so-called assassin's teapot.

Some say that it was created by a secret society of assassins, while others believe that it was invented by a disgruntled tea mug lover who wanted to exact revenge on his enemies.

Whatever its origins, the teapot has become synonymous with death and destruction.

The pot is designed to dispense a deadly poison, and it is believed to have been used in many high-profile assassinations throughout history.

Today, the teapot is still revered by some as a symbol of power and intimidation, while others view it as a dangerous relic of a bygone era.

Regardless of its controversial past, the assassin's teapot remains one of the most intriguing objects in history.

The teapot in question is a small, unassuming pot with a long spout and a curved handle.

It was used by an assassin to poison his victims, and it is believed to have originated in China. 

The teapot was filled with a deadly concoction of toxins, and the assassin would use the long spout to pour the poison into his victim's cup.

The teapot is believed to date back to the Ming Dynasty, and it is said to be cursed.

Those who have owned it have all met with mysterious and untimely deaths. The teapot was last seen in the early twentieth century, and it is unclear what happened to it after that.

It is possible that it was destroyed, but it is also possible that it is still out there somewhere, waiting to claim another victim.

The story of the assassin's teapot begins in the early days of the British Empire. At that time, assassins were often hired to kill important political figures.

In order to prevent these assassinations, the British government decided to create a special teapot that would be used to poison the tea of potential targets.

The teapot was designed with a hidden compartment that could only be opened by a special key.

This key was given to a trusted member of the government who would then use it to poison the tea of anyone deemed to be a threat.

 

assassins teapot

Related: Matcha set

Assassin's Teapot, also known as "LiangXin Teapot" in ancient Chinese history, "LiangXin" means two cores in one teapot, which stands for two different beverages in one pot.

Original Story: It is a wine container used by Chinese nobles in ancient times for drinking & merrymaking, they are interested in tricking others with this tool during banquets, maybe that's the reason why someone is a better drinker than you:)

how to fill the assassin's teapot

Assassin's Tool: There is also a rumor about this "LiangXin Teapot", it's one of assassin favorite tools design to assassinate their target, by using this teapot, they can easily mix regular beverages and poison together, and this caused most the injustices among nobles, trick or treat, that's the killer oath.

  
Old Man Exterior: People may doubt the figure of this teapot, and who is this old man?

He is one of Eight Immortals of ancient Figures in Chinese Myths, and he represents the God of longevity.

People believe that he could bring wellness and wealth.

You may check out  Tea Container Collection here

 

    The story behind the assassin's teapot

    Back to blog